A Workout Plan For Men Over 50

Last month, my neighbour registered at her local gym, she went a couple of times a week for about three weeks, but that was the end.

A relatively short-lived venture. I know this because I ran into her several weeks back near my house. We had a little friendly chat. We are reasonably close, and I remember telling myself how excited she was to get back into fitness like she used to be during her early 20’s. 

A few weeks later, I stopped seeing her leave the house with her gym clothes; since then, there hasn’t been any mention of her regaining her fitness.

Although it’s not new to me, I’ve seen it countless times. People come to the gym, hop on the fun-looking equipment, have a wander about, and then you never see them again. The funny thing is, you can spot that type of person a mile away, just from looking at their tendencies, whether it’s taking multiple gym selfies on their phone or putting minimal effort into each rep. 

Their lack of drive radiates off them like a nuclear power plant. Yes, it’s okay that they made it to the gym in the first place. It’s highly commendable. At least, a journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step. But failing to plan for the months ahead and a clear goal for the future often results in a lack of conviction.

There is a famous saying often credited to Benjamin Franklin, “failing to plan is planning to fail.” This quote may just sound like a clever play on words to some ears because of its lyrical rhymes, but it’s highly factual. Planning is a critical factor in every facet. When neglected, failure may be inevitable.

Having all the information about workout exercises, their benefits, equipment, and how to exercise is never enough if there is no solid plan to use this information for effective productivity.

A workout plan is vital if you are going to succeed in your fitness goals. It would bring me great joy if you saw it as the number one tool in the list of equipment you need for your strength training program. It is the tool that will help you to navigate through your work schedule and other obligations, keeping you motivated towards achieving your goals and assist in breaking down your step-by-step plan on how to attain them.

I’ve gone into greater detail about the potential benefits you enjoy from having a workout plan.

It helps create a lifestyle: A workout plan is a perfect way to form a lifestyle, more so, for older men. A plan makes you accountable. Since you are always responsible, it gets difficult to cheat on the things you planned to do because you made a clear commitment. When you train repeatedly, it becomes part of you. You can use a plan designed by this book, with just a few adjustments to suit your needs.

It provides structure: You might start to feel your sessions are a waste of time. A workout plan gives you structure so that you don’t get lost on what action to take next. You will always know what to do at every point in your mission.

It helps with consistency: There won’t always be time to fit in a workout. A workout plan will let you make your training a priority and be consistent with it through repetition. Your mind and body will learn to get accustomed to your new routine.

It provides and breaks down goals: A workout plan gives you an automatic goal to complete the workout. You can easily break it down into tiny, achievable steps. Achieving every step serves as motivation to reach the next, and so on. You won’t lose track of the successive line of action.

It helps prevent under or overtraining: This is one of the most important reasons you should have a workout plan. Many people without a plan tend to either train too hard and put unnecessary stress on their bodies. You may be doing too much of a particular exercise. But when you have a plan, you won’t suffer from burnout. 

A good plan will give you a balance between workouts and rest. You may feel tired, or something might get in the way (as life tends to do); a schedule will allow you to see what you need to do and plan around life. 

There are so many factors that can go into under or overtraining. It provides a record/checklist: Your workout plan may include a log where you check off an achievement. This won’t only serve as motivation but also evaluate the effectiveness of a particular workout program or specific programs. You can enhance your achievements and eliminate ineffective workout routines.

Keeping track of your workouts also lets you know what’s working and what could be changed. It’s easier to share the experience with others when you have records.

For routine exercises, you can have the following workout exercises. Make sure to do them with perfect form and complete the prescribed sets and reps to the best of your ability. They’ve been handpicked just for men of your age.

What is a rep? For any of you that are unaware, a repetition (rep) is one completed exercise movement – from starting position to action and back to starting position.

What is a set? A set is a certain number of reps. For instance, 8 to 12 reps can make up 1 set.

The main focus of this article is to give you a routine that you can use again and again for as long as you want. It should satisfy your fitness needs and get you on track to achieving the ideal physique for your age.

Building muscle is never easy, no matter who you are. But if you follow my teachings to the best of your ability, you will possess the ticket that goes straight to the top.

This workout plan is crafted for maximum muscle growth, so I have incorporated gym equipment to achieve this. You may be getting angry while reading this now because I devoted a whole chapter to people without gym equipment, and now it seems like I am saying you need them. 

I have chosen the exercises that I believe are the best for men over 50. Some are bodyweight exercises, and some require equipment. However, I understand that people have different circumstances, and you might not like what I have chosen for one reason or another.

To reconcile this (before we get to the good stuff), I have made a shortlist of all the exercises mentioned in this book, along with the muscle group they belong to. This way, you can decide what to swap out without worrying about choosing the wrong exercise. 

Genius, I know. I got the idea from when I was a kid; I would go to the store and pick out five different candies, knowing they all tasted delicious. All I had to do was pick the ones I fancied that day. Here is the list. 

Legs

Bodyweight:

  • #1 The squat – glutes, hip flexors, and quadriceps
  • #2 The lunge – hips, quads, glutes, hamstrings
  • #3 The glute bridge – hamstrings and glutes
  • #4 The fire hydrant – primarily glutes
  • #5 The step-up – quads, glutes, hamstrings
  • #6 The calf raise – primarily calf’s

Dumbbell and resistance bands:

  • #1 The dumbbell goblet squat – glutes, hip flexors, and quadriceps
  • #2 The lunge with dumbbells – hips, quads, glutes, hamstrings
  • #3 The resistance band squat – glutes, hip flexors, and quadriceps

Core – Abdomen

Bodyweight:

  • #7 The crunch – upper and lower abdominal, oblique, and lower back
  • #8 The flutter kick – lower abdominal and hip flexors
  • #9 The Russian twist – all the abdominals and the oblique
  • #12 The plank row – middle and upper back, core, shoulders, and arms
  • #14 The Star plank – all the abdominals and the oblique
  • # 15 The reach under plank – all the abdominals and the oblique

Dumbbell and resistance bands:

  • #11 the dumbbell Russian twist – all the abdominals and the oblique
  • #19 The Russian twist with resistance band – all the abdominals and the oblique
  • #21 The woodchopper with resistance band – primarily oblique
  • #22 The reverse crunch with resistance band – lower abdominals and obliques

Back

Bodyweight:

  • #10 The superman – lower, upper back, and spinal muscles
  • #11 The reverse snow angel – trapezius and lower back
  • #12 The plank row – middle and upper back, core, shoulders, and arms

Dumbbell and resistance bands:

  • #4 The bent-over dumbbell row – upper, mid, and lower back
  • #10 The one-arm dumbbell row – lats and traps
  • #16 The resistance band bent over row – middle and lower back
  • #17 resistance band seated row – upper back

Chest

Bodyweight:

  • #15 The push-up – pectorals, deltoids, and triceps
  • The incline push-up – primarily pectorals
  • The decline push-up – primarily upper pectorals
  • The wide push-up – pectorals, deltoids, and triceps
  • The incline push-up – pectorals, deltoids, and triceps

Dumbbell and resistance bands:

  • #3 The dumbbell bench press – shoulders, triceps, forearms, lats, pectorals, and traps
  • #18 The resistance band push-up – pectorals, deltoids, and triceps
  • #23 The resistance band chest press – shoulders, triceps, forearms, lats, pectorals, and traps

Biceps

Bodyweight:

  • #18 The side-lying bicep curl
  • #19 The leg barbell curl

Dumbbell and resistance bands:

  • #5 The dumbbell bicep curl
  • #6 The cross-body dumbbell hammer curl
  • #13 resistance band bicep curl

Triceps

Bodyweight:

  • #20 The cobra push-up
  • #21 The bodyweight tricep extension

Dumbbell and resistance bands:

  • #9 The overhead dumbbell tricep extension
  • #14 The resistance band overhead tricep extension

Shoulders – Deltoids

Bodyweight:

There aren’t any good bodyweight exercises that isolate the shoulder, but all press-ups I’ve discussed work the shoulder muscles (deltoids), along with other muscle groups.

Dumbbell and resistance bands:

  • #7 The dumbbell side lateral raise
  • #8 The dumbbell shoulder press
  • #15 The resistance band pull-apart
  • #20 The resistance band overhead press

As you progress through the 4-week workout plan, you can swap any of the exercises with the ones mentioned above as long as they are in the same category, i.e., chest or legs.

A 4-WEEK WORKOUT PLAN

WEEK 1

Day 1:

2 – 3 minutes rest between each exercise.

  • Lunge: 2 sets of 10 reps of each side with a 10-second gap between sets.
  • Dumbbell Goblet Squat: 2 sets of 10 reps with a 10-second gap between sets
  • Step Up: 2 sets of 10 reps of each side with a 10-second gap between sets.

Repeat the circuit once.

Day 2:

2 – 3 minutes rest between each exercise.

  • Leg Barbell Curl: 2 sets of 15 reps of each side with a 10-second gap between sets.
  • Plank row: 2 sets of 15 reps of each side with a 10-second gap between sets.
  • Dumbbell Bicep Curl: 2 sets of 10 reps with a 10-second gap between sets.

Repeat the circuit once.

Day 3:

2 – 3 minutes rest between each exercise.

  • Dumbbell Russian Twist: 3 sets of 8 – 12 reps, take 15 seconds before repeating the set.
  • Crunch: 3 sets of 10 – 15 reps with a 10-second gap between sets.

Repeat the circuit once.

WEEK 2

Day 1:

2 minutes rest between each exercise.

  • Reversed Snow Angel: 2 sets of 10 – 15 reps, with a 10-second gap between sets
  • Resistance Band Pull Apart: 2 sets of 15 – 20 reps, with a 5-second gap between sets.
  • Superman: Hold this position for 5 seconds and rest for 5 seconds, do 6 sets

Repeat the circuit one or two times.

Day 2:

2 minutes rest between each exercise.

  • Calf Raise: 2 sets of 20 reps, with a 5-second gap between reps.
  • Step Up: 2 sets of 10 reps of each side with a 10-second gap between sets.
  • Resistance Band Squat: 2 sets of 10 reps with a 10-second gap between sets.

Repeat the circuit one or two times.

Day 3:

2 – 3 minutes rest between each exercise.

  • Push-up: 2 sets of 10 – 15 reps with a 10-second gap between sets.
  • Reach Under Plank: 2 sets of 10 – 15 reps with a 10-second gap between sets.
  • Repeat the circuit one or two times.

WEEK 3

Day 1: 

3 minutes rest between each exercise.

  • Resistance Band Bicep Curl: 2 sets of 8 – 12 reps with a 10-second gap between sets.
  • Bodyweight Triceps Extension: 2 sets of 8 – 12 reps with a 10-second gap between sets.
  • Cross-body Dumbbell Hammer Curl: 2 sets of 10 reps of each side with a 10-second gap between sets.

Repeat the circuit two to three times.

Day 2:

2 minutes rest between each exercise.

  • Plank: Hold the plank position for 15 seconds, rest for 10 seconds, repeat three more times.
  • Flutter Kick: Kick for 10 secs, rest and kick again, repeat three more times.
  • Pilates Toe Tap: 2 sets of 10 reps of each side with a 10-second gap between sets.

Repeat the circuit two to three times.

Day 3:

2 minutes rest between each exercise.

  • Quadruped Dumbbell Row: 3 sets of 8 – 12 reps of each side with a 10-second gap between sets.
  • Wide Dumbbell Row: 3 sets of 8 – 12 reps of each side with a 10-second gap between sets.

Repeat the circuit two to three times.

WEEK 4

Day 1: 

2 minutes rest between each exercise.

  • Dumbbell Goblet Squat: 2 sets of 10 reps of each side with a 10-second gap between sets.
  • Glute Bridge: 2 sets of 10 – 15 reps with a 10-second gap between sets.
  • Fire Hydrant: 2 sets of 10 reps of each side with a 10-second gap between sets.

Repeat the circuit three to four times.

Day 2:

2 – 3 minutes rest between each exercise.

  • Resistance Band Push-up: 3 sets of 10 reps with a 10-second gap between sets.
  • Star Plank: Hold position for 5 seconds, return to starting position, rest, and hold the position again. Repeat for six times.

Repeat the circuit three to four times.

Day 3:

2 – 3 minutes rest between each exercise.

  • Dumbbell Side Lateral Raise: 2 sets of 10 reps with a 10-second gap between sets.
  • Side-Lying Bicep Curl: 2 sets of 5 reps of each side with a 10-second gap between sets.
  • Overhead Dumbbell Press: 8 reps of a single set. Be sure to use lightweight dumbbells.

Repeat the circuit three to four times.

TIPS FOR YOUR WORKOUTS

Warm-up first

This helps prepare your body. It gradually increases your cardiovascular system by raising your temperature and allowing more blood flow to your muscles. It may also reduce soreness and your risk of injury. 

You can warm up with any of these exercises: knee to chest, quad stretch, lunge with overhead reach, and rotation or wide stance shift. A 5-minute warm-up is all you need, so try not to focus on this too much.

Workout Schedule

A scheduled workout is a scheduled appointment. When you plan your workouts, you develop a balance of strength, flexibility, and cardio training every week. If you lack consistency, you may be tempted to fall back on something relatively easy and quick so that you can fit in on that particular day or time. 

So you must schedule the days of the week you’ll be exercising and stay true to it. You should work out three times a week or two if you’re feeling a lot of fatigue. But always take the next day after a workout to rest. 

That is when your muscles go into recovery mode; exercising while in this state would not provide a lot of muscle growth and could lead to injuries. 

The same principles apply with exercising the same muscle groups back to back; even if you have a rest day in between, muscle fatigue increases. In every sense, it is wise to work all of the muscle groups one after the other during the week. 

Lastly, choose a specific time for a workout, either early in the morning or late in the evening, whatever suits your needs. However, once you have selected a time, try to stay loyal to it; it will help you develop a long-lasting exercise habit.

This routine is manufactured to push you every week, but you must understand that everyone is different. You might find that as you advance through the weeks, you start to notice that the activities have become underwhelming, or maybe they were too easy in the first place.

On the other hand, you might find that you’re frequently struggling to finish all of the sets, and your body aches too much the next day.

Although we all share something in common, everyone is reading this article with slightly different circumstances. Our growth varies from person to person.

If either of these apply to you, I urge you to use some initiative and listen to your body. Feeling soreness the day after a workout as usual, but if it’s stopping you from engaging in your daily activities, you should alter the plan. Keep the same level of consistency but take a couple of reps off the next time.

Conversely, the same can be said when the workout plan gets too easy. Don’t use this time to relax; instead, pick up the pace, so you feel that burn again. The holy grail of muscle building is progressive overloading. Meaning once you reach a level of muscle strength, you have to increase the difficulty to hit the level above that, and so on.

Do You Have to Take Supplements with Workout Plan?

It becomes harder for you to lose weight as you get older. As you age, you lose muscle. This has a greater impact than simply losing muscle definition and tone. Since muscle burns more calories than fat, having less muscle makes it harder to burn the calories you consume.

Therefore, apart from doing regular exercises to strengthen your muscles, you might also consider taking some supplements to support weight loss.

Certainly, in order to burn fat, a person cannot rely on a single food or supplement. They should also decrease their calorie intake and increase physical activity. However, when used as part of a healthy diet and lifestyle, fat burners may accelerate weight loss by either increasing metabolism or decreasing appetite.

Traditional approaches to weight loss cannot be substituted by natural supplements. However, they may help people burn slightly more calories every day, gradually increasing weight loss.

Resurge is of the most popular weight loss supplements that promise to help you shed pounds and sleep better. Because studies have shown that sleep deprivation is associated with deficiencies of growth hormone and elevated levels of cortisol, both of which contribute to obesity.

While other supplements promote nutritional factors, meal replacement forms, appetite suppression, or similar effects, Resurge boosts your body’s metabolism by increasing your core temperature. However, before making any purchases, you might want to read some Resurge reviews because the supplement industry is rife with scams.

Besides, it should be noted that supplements are ineffective on their own and are hardly a solution to obesity. Pills or supplements only work when combined with a healthy weight-loss diet and regular exercise.

In any case, it’s always best to talk with your doctor before you start taking a supplement, especially if you are taking medications or have any health concerns.

Leave a Comment