A Plan of Action To Improve Sleep Quality

Your plan to improve sleep must be based on your individual needs and behaviours. How can you come up with a plan, and systematically take the recommendations in this guide and apply them to your life? That’s what this section is about.

Understand the Sleeping issues

When you go to a sleep doctor, it is likely you will get asked questions about your sleep problems. (In fact, if you are going to go to a sleep doctor, think about the answers to these questions beforehand; ideally, type your responses and you can submit it to the doctor)

  1.  Why do you think you have a problem with sleep? What does “sleep success” look like to you?
  2. How long have you had a sleep problem? Was there any particular event that happened in your life during this time?
  3. What time do you wake up and go to sleep? Is it different on weekends?
  4. How long does it take you to go to sleep?
  5. How do you wake up? (alarm, kids, naturally?)
  6. How many times a night do you wake up? Why are you waking up at night?
  7. Are you taking any drugs? Any supplements?
  8. What is your diet? Do you eat salads? What % of your diet is saturated fat?
  9. How often do you exercise? Do you get sick after a few days of regular exercise?
  10. Do you have sleepiness in the afternoon? Do you take naps?
  11. What is your blood sugar level 1 hour after eating? Any diabetes?
  12. Do you face TMJ or jaw tension?
  13. Stress level? Are you an anxious person?
  14. Do you go outside regularly in the sunlight (without sunglasses)? When?

Based on what you have read in the book, you can expect some of your answers may not match the recommendations in the book. There may be a lot of changes you have to make. What changes will give you the biggest bang for the buck?

Establishing a habit will also take 40 days. First, let’s take a look at some of the questions and then prioritize where your efforts to improve sleep should focus.

  1. Why do you think you have a problem with sleep? What does “sleep success” look like to you?
  2. How long have you had a sleep problem? Was there any particular event that happened in your life during this time?
  3. What time do you wake up and go to sleep? Is it different on weekends? You should sleep and wake up at the same time daily. An example schedule would be 11pm to 6am. A duration of 6-8 hours is good for most people.
  4. How long does it take you to go to sleep? It should take less than 20 minutes to get to sleep.
  5. How do you wake up? (alarm, kids, naturally?)
  6. How many times a night do you wake up? Why are you waking up at night? Ideally you only wake up at your wake-up time.
  7. Are you taking any drugs? Any supplements?
  8. What is your diet? Do you eat salads? What % of your diet is saturated fat? Ideally, your diet should have good saturated fats (grass-fed butter or ghee, coconut oil, avocado, and other healthy animal fats), no sugar except what naturally occurs in plants, you eat a few raw vegetables a day, and you sometimes fast.
  9. How often do you exercise? Do you get sick after a few days of regular exercise? You should have intense exercise one to two days a week, and take walks or have other relaxing movements a few other days. Sickness after exercising may indicate excess stress. Glutathione production should be increased.
  10. Do you have sleepiness in the afternoon? Do you take naps? Napping is good. You don’t want to feel exhausted every afternoon though as not every day allows for napping.
  11. What is your blood sugar level 1 hour after eating? Any diabetes? You want to be below 120 mg/dl for a 1 hour after eating a blood sugar test.
  12. TMJ or jaw tension?
  13. Stress level? Are you an anxious person? You should have some activities to manage stress including prayer and social support.
  14. Do you go outside regularly in the sunlight? When? You should go outside sometime (15-30 minutes) morning or midday so that you create vitamin D, and reinforce your circadian rhythm

You want your efforts to improve sleep to focus on these 4 areas.

First, you must do everything possible to reduce stress. Stress is associated with the hormone cortisol.

Second, you must eat a very healthy diet. This means no soda, no added white sugar, lots of raw fruits and vegetables, eating healthy saturated fats, and fasting regularly.

Third, you must have good sleep behaviour including a regular sleep schedule.

Fourth, you can go for supplements. Keep in mind that you want to act and eat properly first so that any supplement you take has a maximal effect (and it might turn out you don’t need a particular supplement).

Today, melatonin supplements are a popular sleep aid, especially when the melatonin cycle is disturbed by jet lag or other factors. Resurge is one of the most popular melatonin supplements that promise to help you sleep better.

Although more research is needed, current evidence suggests that melatonin can be useful in helping people get to sleep. When taken for short or long periods of time, melatonin supplements appear to be safe for adults, according to studies

Resurge supplements might allow your body to absorb enough melatonin to maximize your natural melatonin production. Apart from that, it is also marketed as a weight-loss supplement because epidemiological studies show that insufficient sleep is associated with a higher risk of obesity. 

However, since the supplement industry is barely regulated, you might want to read some reviews for the Resurge supplement before making any purchase.

Some specifics

If you can, have your salivary cortisol (stress hormone) levels checked at various times of the day. You may be in a continuous high cortisol state. This may manifest itself in night wakings where you cannot go back to sleep.

If your mind is racing near bedtime, start your bedtime routine 3 hours before sleep Drink your herbal tea, dim the lights, stop work, and spend time reducing stress. Take an L-Tryptophan (and/or GABA 500 mg or less) tablet. Make sure you had morning light and exercised in the earlier part of the day.

Zeo

The zeo is a sleep monitoring tool. In and of itself, it should not help you sleep better. Instead, if you are interested in fine-tuning your sleep, you can use the Zeo to get a score of your sleep. This is particularly useful if you feel tired during the day. An example usage would be to change one variable in your routine and then monitor your zeo score.

Finally, I will list the top 12 actions or supplements from this book that will improve sleep, in my opinion.

  1. Prayer (and other stress reduction)
  2. Deep breathing
  3. Exercise
  4. Wake up and sleep at the same time daily
  5. Getting sunlight in the earlier part of the day
  6. Coconut oil and “grass-fed” butter (higher fat diet)
  7. Magnesium (ZMA or Mustard oil massage, or Epsom salt bath)
  8. Avoiding work and light at night
  9. Herbal or relaxant tea (magnolia bark, chamomile, holy basil, valerian root, etc…)
  10. Avoid urination at night.
  11. Sleeping in a cooler environment with some slight air movement.
  12. Weight loss

The Best Sleep Supplements Reviewed

I have written many reviews about the best sleep supplements. If you want to know how these sleep supplements work and if they can help you sleep better, you may read the sleep supplements reviews below:

Pitch Black Supplement – Sleep Supplement 

Harmonium Sleep Support – Sleep Supplement 

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